Myotendinous junction & muscle fibers response to heavy resistance training

The myotendinous junction (MTJ) as the interface between muscle and tendon is known to be the weakest link in the muscle-tendon chain, and ultrasonographic visualization of muscle strain injury in humans indicates that tissue damage involves the MTJ. Microscopy of experimental load-to-failure strain injuries in animals has revealed that the actual site of rupture is…

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Concomitant cartilage lesion with ACL rupture show same outcome at 5- 9 Years

Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often associated with other knee injuries. The prevalence of concomitant partial-thickness and full-thickness cartilage lesions at the time of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) has been reported to be 20.2 and 6.4 %, respectively, in the Norwegian and Swedish knee ligament registries, and similar rates have been found in…

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Swimming warm ups: Challenges and current practice

In preparation for competitive events, swimming coaches prescribe a pre-competition warm-up, typically an active, pool-based warm-up. The effectiveness of a warm-up strategy is determined by the intensity and duration of the swimming and dryland elements, as well as the time between warm-up and the onset of the race, the transition phase. Completion of an active…

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The business of sport at football clubs

As the “best soccer team of the 20th century,” Real Madrid won two UEFA Champion League Cups between 1998 and 2001 while paradoxically spiraling into debt. Real Madrid’s situation was not unique; other european football clubs were similarly facing financial hardship. At the time, income generation for a football club was suffering from limited stadium…

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Incomplete Rehabilitation or Physiological failure of Hamstring tear

Reinjury rates after acute hamstring injuries are reported to range from 14% to 63% within the same playing season or up to 2 years after the initial injury. Despite relatively high reinjury risk after hamstring injuries, there is a lack of exact knowledge about their severity, location, and timing. Thus far, the location and severity,…

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Management and Prevention of Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by loss of bone mass, reduced bone mineral density, and deterioration of bone microarchitecture, which lead to bone fragility. Bisphosphonates that are currently approved by the FDA for the prevention or treatment (or both) of osteoporosis include alendronate, ibandronate, risedronate, and zoledronic acid. This review discusses the rationale for…

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Stress fractures in Royal Marines training

Though the incidence of stress fractures in the military is almost half of that of elite athletes (12% vs 21%), recruits who sustain stress fractures are four times more likely to be discharged from training programs and are at a higher risk for sustaining a subsequent stress fracture. Rehabilitation from stress fractures requires personnel and…

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Patellofemoral Pain: What do phenotypic features show?

Ninety percent of patients with patellofemoral pain (PFP), a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized by anterior knee pain, are still in pain 4 years after the initial diagnosis. Specialists have optimized management of other chronic musculoskeletal conditions by subgrouping patients based on risk factors. While previous studies aimed to categorize patients based on imaging studies, this…

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Measuring the hydrodynamic profiles of swimmer’s

A hydrodynamic profile, which is primarily composed of drag force, effects a swimmer’s performance; therefore, coaches, swimmers and sports analysts are keenly interested in the components of drag. Drag force is effected by intrinsic properties of water and the swimmer, decreasing acceleration. Drag is composed of active and passive drag. Passive drag, the focus of…

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